Entry Island by Peter May

I loved Peter May’s Lewis Trilogy, and thoroughly enjoyed his China Series, and boy would I love his travel budget.

He writes evocatively, especially when describing places and landscape; there’s a richness to his language that enhances the story he is telling.

Set in Montreal, Sime Mackenzie is a detective with a Hebridean heritage, an insomnia problem and as if lack of sleep were not enough, he’s working alongside his ex-wife.

There are two interlinked stories here – one set in the time of the clearances and involving Sime’s ancestors and the present day Sime investing the murder of a wealthy islander on Entry Island – the place where those driven out of their homes in Scotland, first landed on their way to French Canada. It is a bleak place with a 100 or so inhabitants, and a place where islanders don’t bother locking their doors due to its isolation.

Prime suspect is his widow, Kirsty. From the first moment Sime meets Kirsty he is drawn to her. He can’t help but feel that somehow he knows her.

As the investigation gets underway, the two interlinked stories drive the troubled Sime to get to the truth of what happened and resolve not only the murder but also an old story that was long in the waiting for its conclusion.

The story itself is not overly strong and requires something of a suspension of disbelief, but the writing is strong and hauntingly evocative. Certainly worth reading.

Death Can’t Take A joke by Anya Lipska (Kiszka and Kershaw 2)

D.C. Natalie Kershaw is about to join the Murder squad, but first she has to clear up the case of the un identified man who fell from the top of a skyscraper and died. Janusz Kiszka is a long time Polish emigre, and troubleshooter for Poles in London. He and Natalie have met before, in the first book of the series, and his focus is on finding out who murdered his close friend Jim – and why.
As the plot develops, it is clear that their cases intertwine and each finds the other useful, though limiting the amount of information they are prepared to share..
Meanwhile, Natalie is about to move in with her puppy-eyed policeman sergeant boyfriend, Ben, but she’s finding it hard to shake off her misgivings; misgivings which turn into terrible doubts as she moves in, only to turn around and go straight back out after she discovers something that shakes her belief in him and what he stands for.

Death Can’t take a Joke is the first of Anya Lipska’s books that I have read, but it certainly won’t be the last. Well plotted, nicely stranded together and with flawed but likeable central characters, I look forward to reading more of this series. Thanks to Netgalley for a review copy of this book.

No Other Darkness by Sarah Hilary (Marnie Rome/Noah Jake 2)

Two young boys.

Trapped underground in a bunker.

Unable to understand why they are there.

Desperate for someone to find them.

Slowly realising that no-one will…

Five years later, the boys’ bodies are found and the most difficult case of D.i. Marnie Rome’s career begins. Her only focus is the boys. She has to find out who they are and what happened to them. For Marnie, there is no other darkness than this.

no other darkness

I enjoyed the first Marnie Rome/Noah Jake book so much that I was really looking forward to reading the second by Sarah Hilary. So when I was offered the opportunity to read it in advance of publication, I jumped at it.

I started to read No Other Darkness over Christmas, and it wasn’t long before I found myself wondering if I hadn’t picked the wrong time to read it. Because this is a dark and often bleak book and, in a good way, really very unnerving.

Marnie Rome is a great character. Learning more about her is part of the delight of this book; it is as if the author is very slowly and with great delicacy peeling away her armour, one layer at a time. The more you learn, the more you want to know.

We see more of Noah Jake, her partner in crime, too and learn more about his family and domestic situation. He is a lovely character, and you just know you’d like him if you met him.

Families are a recurring theme in this novel; Noah’s, Marnie’s and the victims’, but what stands out is the darkness that is in everyone, and that’s the standout theme for me in this book.

The story follows Marnie as she tries to find out who the boys are and what happened to them. As she progresses, the darkness of the boys’ story meshes with the darkness in Marnie’s life and just as she strives to find answers to the murders of Fred and Archie, so she finds herself seeking answers to her own traumatic past.

This is a clever, fluent book with a riveting narrative and disturbing psychological insights. It kept me riveted, and with a nod to the cliche, it really did feel as if my heart was in my mouth while I read it.

it is a while since I have read anything quite so compelling. I loved Someone Else’s Skin but in No Other Darkness, Sarah Hilary explores her characters with forensic insight and serious skill.

It’s only January, but I will be very lucky if I read anything better this year.

Thanks to Sarah Hilary and Headline Publishing. This book is published on April 23rd 2015

Die Again (Rizzoli & Isles 11) by Tess Gerritsen

die again

I am an unashamed fan of the Rizzoli and Isles books in particular and of Terss Gerritsen generally. Unlike other long character series, Die Again felt fresh and lively and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Set in Botswana and Boston, Die Again links murders in the bush with a series of homicides in Boston and the wider area. Millie has gone on safari with her boyfriend, Richard. But all is not well between them and as if strained relationships in the safai camp were not enough, soon the deaths begin.

Meanwhile, back in Boston, a killer begins to erase everyone who poses a threat.

As ever, there’s a little more insight into the domestic lives of both Rizzoli and Isles and their families and I love the relationship between Jane and Maura which crackles with realism in its detail.

From the Okavango Delta, Botswana to Boston Zoo, this police procedural/crime thriller works because the storylines are strong and the characters well drawn.
I did know ‘whodunnit’ fairly early on, but that didn’t in any way detract from a thoroughly enjoyable book. I wanted to see how the central story line was resolved, and I wasn’t disappointed. Gerritsen has done it again – a really good page turner.

Someone Else’s Skin by Sarah Hilary

A welcome new addition to women’s crime fiction. Written with good pace and cleverly revealing just enough about the central characters to keep us gripped, Someone Else’s Skin  introduces a new crime duo. D.I Marnie Rome is a class act. Holding a few secrets to herself, she and her police partner, Detective Noah Jake visit a women’s refuge hoping to persuade one of the residents to testify to a family member’s propensity for serious violence. And it is at the refuge that the core of the novel’s theme of domestic violence is explored through the interlinking lives of the women who are staying there.
As much a strong psychological thriller as police procedural, it kept me interested all the way through. I look forward to getting to know more about Marnie Rome.

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